Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Tarina Tarantino Floriculture Palette Review

I know, I know...yet another Tarina Tarantino palette review (when will I stahp!). There's a story behind this... (not really). After I reviewed my other Tarina palettes (Magical,  Dreamy,  Fantastical,  Delightful & the Emerald Pretty), I was reading up on all the palettes that she'd released, and found that I was missing a few. No big deal, right? Right. Two weeks after, I go to Hautelook (I swear that website is my weakness) and what do I find? The palettes that I'm missing. On 65% discount. I'm sure it was a sign from the universe (it's what I'm telling myself anyway!)

So, I have the Floriculture palette with me. If you think it sounds, well, floral, you're right. This is a nice spring-themed palette with some lovely shades.



The palette is made of cardboard, and has a pretty floral design on it. The silver cap in the middle is raised up, and kind of ruins it for me, because with it, the palette is not flat. You cannot stack other palettes on top of this, because of that silver knob-like thing. Why couldn't she just have, I don't know, printed her name out in silver on the surface of the palette? (Yes I know it's a minor thing but it's a wee bit annoying, mmkay?)


Inside the palette is a some sort of butter-paper like insert, with some background on the inspiration behind the palette. Interesting, but doesn't add anything to the palette.


As mentioned before, the packaging is made of cardboard, and while it is sturdy and will hold up well to travel, it is bulky. It's quite a fat palette (width-wise, that is). There's a nice-sized mirror inside, but I wish it was rectangular rather than oval - the shape of the mirror makes it a tad difficult for me to use. Of course, others might find it perfectly serviceable. Nevertheless, I must admit the shape is rather fetching, even if slightly un-functional (is that a word? I'm making it one.)



There are 8 shadows housed inside the palette. These are quite large, and come in a variety of finishes. They are also very spring like - the shades are not pastels, but soft and subdued. I can see these suiting a variety of skintones.

The shades are all named after flowers and plants, generally very garden-themed. They are:
- Hollyhock
- Trumpette
- Night Hopper
- Taurella
- Secret Pond
- Deep Dahlia
- Poppycock
- Tiny Pansie


Hollyhock is a medium, cool toned brown with a satin finish. It's got quite a grey cast running through it that makes it distinctly cool toned. If you have strong yellow (warm) undertones, the grey cast will be more prominent. Neutral and cool undertones will not have this issue.

Trumpette is a medium peach-y orange with a pearl finish. This is a warm color, and looks absolutely glorious on deeper, warm toned skins. When applied to the lid, it does brighten the eye up. It's a lovely shade and will suit most people, regardless of skin tone or undertone.

Secret Pond is a light, mossy grey-green with a shimmer finish. This is another lovely shade; despite the grey in the color, it doesn't show up harsh on warmer tones. Pair this with a deeper brown in the crease and it's very day appropriate. Paired with a deeper emerald green in the crease, and black in the outer V, and it's a twist to a smokey eye.

Deep Dahlia is a deep reddened plum with a matte finish. This is a cool toned shade, but a lovely one nevertheless. It's definitely a very 'vampy' shade; but it's wearable. For the day, use it as a liner for a twist on the regular black/brown; for the night, wear it in the crease and outer V with a gold shadow on the lid.


Night Hopper is warm-toned medium taupe with a satin finish. It has a little bit of red in it, which is probably what contributes to the warmness of the color. This is one of my favorite taupe shades; some taupes are too cool toned for me to wear (think Maybelline Color Tattoo in Tough As Taupe) but this one goes well with my warm tones. Most warm tones will find this lovely; cool tones may have to work a little with it. It is a nice lid shade for deeper tones, and a good crease shade for lighter skins.

Taurella is creamy off white color with a very visibly gold sheen to it. It has a frosted finish. It makes a gorgeous highlight - not just for the eye, but for the face. Try dusting this lightly over your cheekbones and you'll glow without shining!

Poppycock is a blue-purple ('blurple') with a shimmer finish. It's cool toned, and reminds me of orchids. It's a very, very pretty, very feminine color. Wear it sheered out with a medium brown in the crease to make it more wearable for the day, or use it wet to really bring out the shimmer.

Tiny Pansie is a light-medium pink with a frost finish. It's neutral, and will suit both warm and cool toned skins. It's a nice lid shade (paired with a brown), or you could use it as a highlight (it won't work as a highlight for lighter skins, because it's fairly pigmented).





These shadows are all soft and creamy. The powder is finely milled, and they are highly pigmented. Application is very easy, and blending is no problem at all.

Wear time over primer is excellent - I get a solid 8 hours with no fading. The color intensity is amazing; what you see in the pan is what you get (without accounting for your personal undertones - for example, Hollyhock will look different on different people because of the cool-toned nature).

My only gripe with this palette is that it doesn't have a matte brown shade. I feel that if they had a matte brown (maybe a medium brown and a deeper brown), this would have been a more workable palette. A lot of the shades need a matte brown in order to make them more wearable (and work-friendly). You can certainly create a multitude of looks with the shades included, but having the brown would have matte the palette better, in my opinion.

I think this is a great spring palette, especially for deeper skins. Pastels tend to wash deeper skins out, but these are very soft and subdued and create a very 'garden-y' look.

BGMM Rating: A- 

2 comments:

  1. Such interesting colors! Dahlia is definitely the eyecatcher in this palette.

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    1. They are some unique colors.... I'd call them the grown up version of pastels!

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